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Moving When You’re Mourning: Relocation After a Loved One’s Death

Moving When You’re Mourning: Relocation After a Loved One’s Death

This article previously appeared on the Sparefoot.com Moving Blog

When someone you share a home with dies, your grieving process can become even more complicated if you’re dealing with a potential move.

Motivational speaker Carole Brody Fleet, author of “Happily Even After: A Guide to Getting Through (and Beyond) the Grief of Widowhood,” faced this decision after the death of her husband, Mike Fleet, in 2000. Mike had suffered from Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Not only was she living in an area that was in decline, but Fleet had emotional reasons for finding a new home.

“Living with all of the wonderful memories combined with the memory of him dying at home proved to be overwhelming,” she said.

If you’re thinking of making this type of move, consider these four pieces of advice for overcoming the logistical and emotional challenges.

In conjunction with National Moving Day, which in 2015 falls on May 26, SpareFoot is sharing various stories about people who’ve moved amid life-changing events. This story focuses on relocating after the death of a loved one.

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Direct Cremation?

Direct Cremation Advantages

Direct cremation offers an affordable alternative to traditional body burial.

While direct cremation can significantly reduce funeral home costs, you can reap additional financial benefits from the cemetery and headstone dealer. If you choose not to bury the cremated remains - and many people do not - you can eliminate many items that make the traditional funeral so expensive.

Here is a list of costs you can eliminate by choosing direct cremation:
    • expensive casket
    • embalming
    • funeral home staff and facilities charge
    • cosmetic and hair dressing charges
    • funeral chapel or church fees
    • viewing or visitation charges
    • transportation fees (hearse, flower car, utility vehicle, etc.)
    • burial plot or mausoleum crypt
    • vault or grave liner
    • grave opening and closing costs
    • headstone or grave marker

Find trusted funeral homes near you to compare quality and prices

Save Money on Funeral Costs by Making Arrangements at a Low-Priced Funeral Home and Cemetery

Many people don’t realize that prices can vary greatly between funeral homes. Over just the last three years many family-run funeral homes (and local cemeteries) have been taken-over by big global corporations. These big corporate funeral homes often keep the original owner’s family name on the door so they don't scare away their old customers. Unfortunately, these corporations often raise prices by 30% to 50%.

Don't just the pick the same old funeral home

This is why you should NOT automatically use the same funeral home you have used in the past UNTIL you check to see if they have SINCE become part of one of the big funeral corporations – as so many have!